Uber is getting off the roads and into the seas! Beginning May 27, riders in Queensland, Australia will be able to request a ride all the way to the Great Barrier Reef in an Uber submarine, scUber. This is the world’s first ride share submarine experience. Until now, it was far more difficult to Great Barrier Reef submarine tours. You don’t need any snorkelling equipment or a driver’s license, sit back and enjoy the ride.

The ride will cost $1500 per person and passengers will dive to a maximum depth of 30 metres. This is the same level that scuba divers reach. Passengers will have a 180-degree view of the Great Barrier Reef, reports CNN.

How scUber operates Great Barrier Reef submarine tours

save the Great Barrier Reef in Australia
The Great Barrier Reef as seen from above

The submarine ride will last for one hour and will operate on set dates from Heron Island between May 27 and June 3, before shifting to Agincourt Reef, off the coast of Port Douglas, from June 9-18. There will only be 12 trips; and bookings will be available on the Uber app at 7.30am on the day of each departure.

Also Read: New Project Looks To Save The Great Barrier Reef in Australia

It will also include a pick-up by helicopters – from Gladstone for the Heron Island departures, and chopper transfers from Cairns, Port Douglas and Palm Cove to the submarine’s northern departure point on the Quicksilver Cruises pontoon, on the outer edge of the reef.

The Great Barrier Reef is composed of over 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching for over 2,300 kilometres.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Susan Anderson regional general manager of Uber in Australia and New Zealand made the announcement in a press release. She said, “At Uber, we believe good things happen when people move — whether that’s by getting people from A to B in their city, or by making dreams come true experiencing the world’s greatest natural wonder, the Great Barrier Reef.”

Uber will also be partnering with Citizens of the Great Barrier reef to help protect and conserve the reef which is struggling to recover from the consequences of intense climate change.

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