There are lots of beautiful places in the UK. From cosy villages to serene beaches, the country is full of amazing places. So the next time you visit, make sure to head out of the cities and check out some of these incredible places.

1. The Dark Hedges, Northern Ireland

dark hedges northern ireland

Bregagh Road in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, is popularly known as the Dark Hedges thanks to its tunnel of beech trees. Fans of HBO’s Game of Thrones may also recognise it as the show’s “Kings Road”.

2. Portmeirion, Wales

The colorful village and gardens of Portmeirion in North Wales.

This small yet vibrant Mediterranean-style village was built by Sir Clough Williams-Ellis between 1925 and 1975. It is Located near the River Dwyryd and has a hotel, spa, restaurant, tea-room, beach, and numerous shops.

Also Read: History and Excitement in Wales

3. Fingal’s Cave, the Isle of Staffa, Scotland

Fingals Cave Scotland Beautiful Places in the UK

This cave is full of unique angular basalt columns. They create an area with breathtaking acoustics, especially with the waves that crash inside. It is similar to the nearby Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland.

4. The Old Man of Storr, the Isle of Skye

The iconic Old Man of Storr rock formation, Scotland, United Kingdom

The dramatic and unusual rock towers that form the Old Man of Storr are located on the Trotternish Peninsula. It is also set atop an ancient landslide.

Also Read: Incredible Rock Formations You Have To See

5. Lake Windermere, Cumbria

Lake Windermere

Located in the idyllic Lake District National Park in northwest England, Lake Windermere is one of the most popular destinations in the area. It is surrounded mountain peaks and villages, including Bowness-on-Windermere.

6. Stonehenge, Wiltshire

Stonehenge at sunset

One of the most prehistoric structures in all of Europe, Stonehenge dates back to c. 3000 BC. The ring of stones has puzzled scientists and archaeologists, and no one still knows what it was used for.

Also Read: Oldest Buildings On The Planet

7. Durdle Door, Dorset

Durdle Door Dorset

The Jurassic Coast near Lulworth in Dorset is home to the incredible Durdle Door. This limestone arch is over 400 feet tall and is privately owned, though it’s still open to visitors.

8. Tresco Abbey Gardens, the Isle of Scilly, Cornwall

Tresco Abbey Gardens Cornwall

The Isle of Scilly is located about 30 miles off the coast of Cornwall and has an almost tropical air. It is home to the privately owned Tresco Island and the Tresco Abbey Gardens, an oasis of palm trees and exotic plants. It has over 20,000 plants from 80 countries around the world.

Also Read: Unforgettable Experiences In Cornwall

9. Whiteless Pike, Lake District

Buttermere and Whiteless Pike

Whiteless Pike is a hilly range (or fell) located in the Lake District. It sits over Lake Buttermere, and the small peaked summit also provides beautiful views of the lakes Crummock and Loweswater.

10. The White Cliffs of Dover

Cliffs of Dover

The iconic and striking white cliffs of Dover are located on the English coastline, facing the Strait of Dover and France. The chalky cliff face reaches heights of 350 feet.

Also Read: Breathtaking Places Around The World

11. Giant’s Causeway, Northern Ireland

The Giant's Causeway geological feature on the Antrim coast in Northern Ireland

On the north-eastern coast of Ireland are the massive hexagonal shaped black basalt columns known as the Giant’s Causeway. It was formed 50 to 60 million years ago by volcanic activity in the region.

12. Cheddar Gorge, Somerset

Cheddar Gorge Somerset

Located near Bath and the village of Cheddar is the magnificent natural setting of Cheddar Gorge. These limestone cliffs were created by Ice Age melt waters, and are the perfect spot for a long walk. You can also explore its fascinating prehistoric findings from the Stone Age occupation.

Also Read: Georgian Splendour At Bath

13. Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire, Wales

Tintern Abbey

Though the roof has long disappeared from Tintern Abbey, this 12th-century church remains hauntingly beautiful. Located in the dramatic Wye Valleys, the Gothic ruins inspired the famous poem by William Wordsworth.

14. Micheldever Forest, Hampshire

Bluebells-and-Beech-trees-natural-setting
Bluebells-and-Beech-trees-natural-setting

From late April to early May, a multitude of dainty bluebells covers the floor of the Micheldever Forest in a “purple carpet.” It is just one of the numerous places across the country where these flowers bloom each spring. You can also find bluebells at the Blickling Estate in Norfolk, Buckland, Devon and Dunham Massey, Cheshire among other places.

Also Read: Places To See Flowers In Spring

15. Wistman’s Wood, Dartmoor

Wistman's Wood Dartmoor

Said to be a legendary Druids’ grove, Wistman’s Wood is one of only three high-altitude oakwoods on Dartmoor in Devon. This unusual and atmospheric forest and the many boulders scattered around it are covered in moss and lichen.

16. Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland

Bamburgh Castle

Located on the northeast coast of England, Bamburgh Castle was once a Celtic fort. Built around 430 AD, it was later destroyed by the Vikings and rebuilt by the Normans and restored during Victorian times. With such a rich history and breathtaking views of the sea, it is a must-see.

Also Read: Medieval Cities To See In The UK

17. Loch Ness, Scottish Highlands

Loch Ness Inverness Scotland

One of the most well-known lochs (or lakes) of the Scottish Highlands is Loch Ness. Located near the town of Inverness, the deep, freshwater loch is most famous for the mythical (and fictional) Loch Ness Monster, or “Nessie,” who is said to live in it. You can also visit the remains of Urquhart Castle that lies on the shores.

18. Gold Hill, Shaftesbury

Gold Hill in Shaftesbury, Dorset, England

Gold Hill is a steep cobbled street with picturesque houses in the town of Shaftesbury in Dorset. The view of down Gold Hill is said to be “one of the most romantic sights in England.”

Also Read: Picturesque Villages Around The World

19. The Needles, the Isle of Wight

The Needles Isle of Wight

What was once a tall and thin rock cliff, that gave the group its name, collapsed in the late 1700s. Now, the row of three distinctive stacks of chalk rises to a height of 30 meters from the sea off the western coast of the Isle of Wight.

20. Llanberis Pass, Snowdonia

Llanberis Pass Wales

This rugged slate strewn mountain pass runs over 8 kilometres from Llanberis to Pen-y-Pass. Its fine mountain scenery is home to numerous walks, including ones that will take you to Snowdon and the picturesque town of Betws-y-Coed.

Also See: Things To See and Do In Snowdonia

21. Norfolk Lavender, Norfolk

Heacham Lavender Fields Norfolk

The village of Heacham in Norfolk is home to some of England’s loveliest lavender fields. You can also find similarly stunning fields at the Cotswolds, Kent, York, Hertfordshire, and Somerset.

22. The Royal Pavillion, Brighton

The Royal Pavilion at Brighton, East Sussex, England things to see and do in Brighton

The Royal Pavilion, also known as the Brighton Pavilion, is an exotic palace in the centre of Brighton. It was built as a seaside pleasure palace for King George IV in 1811 when he was still Prince Regent. It is a unique mix of Regency grandeur with stylistic elements from India and China

Also Read: Top Places To See In Brighton

23. Glen Nevis, Scottish Highlands

Glen Nevis Scotland

Glen Nevis is one of the most picturesque glens (or valleys) in Scotland. It is located at the foot of Ben Nevis, the highest (and one of the most popular) mountains in the UK. To the other end of the glen is the town of Fort William.

24. Rye, East Sussex

Rye, East Sussex

This town near the coast in East Sussex is known for its cobbled lanes that are lined with medieval, half-timbered houses. You can visit the 14th-century Ypres Tower (now the Rye Castle Museum) and the Norman St. Mary’s Church to get stunning views of the town.

Also Read: Hidden Gems of the UK

25. Llanthony Priory, Monmouthshire, Wales

Llanthony Priory, South Wales

Situated in the picturesque Vale of Ewyas, near the Black Mountains, is this ruined former Augustinian Priory. The Llanthony Priory dates back to the 1100s and fell to ruin (like Tintern Abbey) after by Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries.

26. Kynance Cove, Cornwall

Kynance Cove beach, Lizard peninsula, South West Cornwall, UK.

The white sand and blue seas of Kynance Cove look like something in the Mediterranean. The stunning beach, with its secret caves and islands, is one of the most photographed and painted located in Cornwall. It was featured on BBC’s hit series Poldark.

Also Read: Cornish Food You Have To Try 

27. Lavender Fields, Banstead

Lavender Fields Banstead Sutton

Located just a few kilometres from central London, the lavender fields at Banstead cover over 25 acres. Located in Banstead, Surrey, the Mayfield Lavender Farm is the perfect picnic spot for a day out.

28. Pen-y-Fan, Brecon Beacons, Wales

Pen-y-Fan Wales

Located in the Brecon Beacons National Park, Pen y Fan is the highest peak in South Wales. Located 886 meters above sea level, the impressive views from the peak and the neighbouring Corn Du are truly magnificent.

Also Read: Delicious Welsh Food From Wales

29. Fairy Pools, the Isle of Skye

Fairy Pools United Kingdom

Situated in a hidden valley in the Isle of Skye is a series of crystal clear pools waterfalls. They are surrounded by cone-shaped hills and bubbling streams. Located near Uig, they’re the perfect size for a quick (if freezing) dip.

30. Dunnottar Castle, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Medieval fortress Dunnottar Castle, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

The ruin of the 15th-century Dunnottar Castle is located atop a natural peninsula. The rocky outcrop of land juts into the North Sea just off the northeast coast of Scotland.

Also Read: Traditional Scottish Food You Must Eat

31. Minack Theatre, Cornwall

The Minack Theater Cornwall

This clifftop amphitheatre is carved into a rocky granite outcrop overlooking the town of Porthcurno and the bright blue Atlantic. Built into the 1930s by Rowena Cade, it is now a popular open-air performance space.

32. Chatsworth House, Derbyshire

hatsworth House and Estate, Derbyshire, UK

The stately Chatsworth House in Derbyshire is one of the most stunning country houses in England. Situated on the east bank of the River Derwent, it is set amongst expansive woods and landscaped parkland. It is the home of the Dukes of Devonshire and has been passed down through 16 generations of the Cavendish family. Chatsworth House has also been featured in numerous films, most famously as Pemberley, Mr Darcy’s home in Pride and Prejudice.

Also Read: 6 London Palaces You Have To See

33. Barfundle Bay, Pembrokeshire, Wales

Barafundle Beach Pembrokeshire

Located near the village of Stackpole in Pembrokeshire, Barafundle Bay was once owned by the Cawdor family. Nestled between cliffs, and known for its sand dunes and pine trees, this scenic and secluded beach is said to among the top beaches in the world.

34. Hadrian’s Wall, Cumbria

Hadrian's Wall in Northern England with dramatic processing.

Also known as the Roman Wall, this defensive fortification was built by the Romans, beginning in 122 AD, in the reign of the emperor Hadrian. It was meant to separate the Roman province of Britannia from the lands of the northern Ancient Britons, including the Picts. However, it doesn’t mark the modern boundary between England and Scotland.

Also Read: Looking For King Arthur In Britain

35. Buachaille Etive Mor, Scottish Highlands

Buchaille Etive Mor Glencoe

Also known simply as “The Buachaille,” this is perhaps the most recognisable mountain in Scotland. It is located at the head of Glen Etive in the Highlands and is encircled by the River Etive. Some of the most stunning and iconic views of the mountain are from Glen Coe

36. Llyn Dinas, Snowdonia, Wales

Llyn Dinas Snowdonia Wales

This lake near Gwynedd in north Wales lies in a valley north of Beddgelert. Though the lake itself is quite shallow (with a maximum depth of only 10 metres) its cover a massive area of over 60 acres. The mountain lake offers some excellent walks with panoramic views.

Also Read: Things To Do In Cardiff

37. High Force, Durham

High Force Waterfall

The fast-flowing waterfalls and lush forest of High Force in County Durham make it one of the most spectacular and beautiful places in the UK. With a drop of 21 meters, the twin falls are surrounded by a diverse range of flora and fauna.

38. Smoo Cave, Scottish Highlands

Waterfall in Smoo Cave, Durness, Scotland

The large Smoo Cave is a combined sea cave and an inner freshwater cave located in Durness. This mystical cave is riddled with caves and tunnels. However, the most stunning sight is the waterfall where the Smoo burn drops over 24 meters into a cavern below.

Also Read: Places to See in Edinburgh

39. Langmull Beach, the Isle of Mull

Langamull Beach Isle of Mull

Often called one of the best-kept secrets on the Isle of Mull, Langamull Beach looks like something out of the Caribbean. Though it is located 3 kilometres away from the nearest roads, this secluded beach offers spectacular views over to the Small Isles and Skye.

40. Dun Briste, Downpatrick, Northern Ireland

Dun Briste Downpatrick Head Co Mayo

Located near the town of Knockaun lies the colossal 50-meter-tall sea-stack called Dun Briste. Meaning “the Broken Fort,” the stack was separated by the mainland by corrosive waves in the late 1300s.

Also Read: Things To Do In Dublin

41. Sgwd Yr Eira, Brecon Beacons, Wales

Sgwd yr Eira waterfall in the Brecon Beacons National Park, Wales,

Sgwd Yr Eira is one of several spectacular waterfalls found in Mellte Valley of the Brecon Beacons. Literally meaning “fall of snow,” you can still walk behind the falling sheet of water, on pather carved by generations of sheep farmers.

42. Glenfinnan Viaduct, Scottish Highlands

The famous Glenfinnan viaduct carries the railway to Glenfinnan Station Scotlannd

This spectacular railway is perhaps the most instantly recognizable locations in Scotland. Featured in four of the Harry Potter films on the journey the Hogwarts Express makes from King’s Cross Station to the school, it has become known as the Harry Potter bridge.

Also Read: The World of Harry Potter In Britain

43. Mealt Falls, the Isle of Skye

Mealt waterfalls, Isle of Skye

Located near the magnificent Kilt Rock (which is said to look like a pleated kilt) is the stunning Mealt waterfall. Fed by the nearby Mealt Loch, this waterfall is so high that on windy days the water doesn’t even touch the ground.

44. St Michael’s Mount, Cornwall

St Michael's Mount island in Cornwall

St Michaels Mount, located to the east of Penzance in Cornwall is one of the most photographed locations in the UK. This abbey is located in a small tidal island and was built by Benedictine monks (the same religious order that also constructed a sister abbey at Mont St-Michel in France) during the 12th century.

Also Read: Destinations Straight Out Of A Fairytale

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